Universities in France

The University of Paris (French: L'Université de Paris), often known as the Sorbonne or la Sorbonne, was noted as one of the first universities to be established in Europe. It was founded in the mid-12th century in Paris, France, officially recognized between 1160 and 1250.[1] Following the French Revolution, its activities were suspended from 1793 to 1896. With the growth of higher education in the postwar years in France, in 1970 the university was divided into thirteen autonomous institutions. The university is often referred to the Sorbonne after the collegiate institution (Collège de Sorbonne) founded around 1257 by Robert de Sorbon, but it was always larger than the Sorbonne. Of the thirteen current successor universities, four have premises in the historical Sorbonne building, and three of them include "Sorbonne" in their names.

The universities in Paris are independent from each other. Some of them fall within the Créteil or Versailles education authorities instead of the Parisian one. Some residual administrative functions of the thirteen universities are formally supervised by a common chancellor, the rector of the Paris education authority, whose offices are at the Sorbonne. Recently, those universities have coalesced as two university groups: Sorbonne Paris Cité and Sorbonne University.


University of Paris-Sud (University of Paris XI) is a French university distributed among several campuses in the southern suburb of Paris (including Orsay, Cachan, Châtenay-Malabry, Sceaux and Kremlin-Bicêtre campuses). The main campus is located in Orsay (48.699890°N 2.173309°E). This university is a member of the UniverSud Paris.

Paris-Sud is one of the largest and most renowned French universities, particularly in science and mathematics. Paris-Sud is ranked 2nd in France, 7th in Europe and 39th worldwide by the 2013 Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU).[1] Furthermore, in this latest edition of ARWU ranking, the university is ranked 15th globally in the field of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; in the five general subject rankings, the university is ranked 7th in mathematics and 19th in physic

Paris-Sud was originally part of the University of Paris, which was subsequently split into several universities. After World War II, the rapid growth of nuclear physics and chemistry meant that research needed more and more powerful accelerators, which required large areas. The Université de Paris, the École Normale Supérieure and the Collège de France looked for space in the south of Paris near Orsay. Later some of the teaching activity of the Faculty of Sciences in Paris was transferred to Orsay. The rapid increase of students led to the independence of the Orsay Center on March 1, 1965.

Pierre and Marie Curie University (French: Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie; abbreviated UPMC), also known as University of Paris VI (Paris 6),[3] is a public research university located on the Jussieu Campus in the Latin Quarter of the 5th arrondissement of Paris, France. It was established in 1971 following the division of the University of Paris (Sorbonne), and is a principal heir to Faculty of Sciences of the University of Paris (French: Faculté des sciences de Paris). The French cultural revolution of 1968, commonly known as "the French May", resulted in the division of the world's second oldest academic institution, the University of Paris, into thirteen autonomous universities. UPMC is the largest scientific and medical complex in France, active in many fields of research with scope and achievements at the highest level, as demonstrated by the many awards regularly won by UPMC researchers, and the many international partnerships it maintains across all five continents.[4] Several university rankings have regularly put UPMC at the 1st place in France, and it has been ranked as one of the top universities in the world. The ARWU (2014) has ranked UPMC as the 1st in France, 6th in Europe and 35th in the world and also 4th in field of mathematics, 25th in field of physics, 14th in field of natural sciences and 32nd in field of engineering, technology and computer science.[5] It has more than 125 laboratories, most of them in association with the Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS). Some of its most notable institutes and laboratories include the Institut Henri Poincaré, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, Laboratoire d'informatique de Paris 6 (LIP6), Institut de mathématiques de Jussieu (shared with University Paris-Diderot) and the Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel (shared with École Normale Supérieure). The University's Faculty of Medicine Pierre and Marie Curie is located in the teaching hospitals Pitié-Salpêtrière and Saint-Antoine (the latter itself being the successor to Saint-Antoine-des-Champs Abbey). UPMC delivers a diploma in physics in English, since September 2013 for Université Paris-Sorbonne Abou Dhabi

The Southwestern University (SWU) is a private university in Cebu City, Philippines founded on 1946 by two pharmacists. It started as Southwestern Colleges in the summer of 1946 and became a university on December 11, 1959. It has three campuses in Metro Cebu. Southwestern University is in the south of the City of Cebu, Philippines. The university has three campuses. The main campus is located on Urgello St.; the Aznar Coliseum Complex is on Aznar Road; and the Basak Campus on Sabellano St., Basak, and Cebu City. The main campus is the home of the colleges of Arts and Sciences, School of Business, Computer Studies, Criminology, Dentistry, Engineering, Graduate School, Law, Maritime, Medical Technology, Medicine, Optometry, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, and Teachers' College. The Sacred Heart Hospital, Pathology and Biology Museums, Library, Interfaith Chapel, Botanical Garden, and the Administrative Offices are found in the main campus. Located about 50 meters from the main campus, this complex is made up of Aznar Memorial Coliseum, a ballpark, and the Anunciacion B. Aznar building which houses the Elementary and High School Departments, the Maritime Regiment, the 540th NROTC Unit and the College of Nursing. The third campus is the South Campus (formerly the Basak Campus), which houses the College of Veterinary Medicine and the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. The Elementary and High School Training departments are here. In summer of 1946, when the Philippines was in the rehabilitation process after World War II, Southwestern University was founded with the name Southwestern Colleges. The founders were husband-and-wife pharmacists Matias Hipolito Chavez Aznar II and Anunciacion Barcenilla Aznar. Southwestern Colleges started with 18 faculty members and 509 students in three two-storey buildings on an approximately two-hectare lot. It had the following courses: elementary, high school (day and night classes), first two years of Arts and Sciences (Associate programs), Education and Commerce, and first-year Law. In the school year 1946–47, the Colleges of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and the Graduate School were opened. The College of Nursing was added in school year 1948–1949. The school became a university on December 11, 1959 with its formal inauguration and the investiture of the co-founder and second president Annunciation Barcenilla Aznar on February 13, 1960. The school year 1959–1960 also started with two new courses: Engineering and Optometry. The College of Medical Technology was opened in 1962. Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine came after a few years. The latest colleges added were Computer Studies, Physical Therapy, Maritime, and Criminology. In 2009, the university had 20 colleges and departments. Southwestern University has continuously expanded its curricular offerings and its physical plant. The university now occupies more than 18 hectares. The Aznar Coliseum with a seating capacity of approximately 7,000–8,000 is the venue for sports and cultural activities.

More Details The Southwestern University

The University of Paris often known as the Sorbonne or la Sorbonne, was noted as one of the first universities to be established in Europe. It was founded in the mid-12th century in Paris, France, officially recognized between 1160 and 1250.[1] Following the French Revolution, its activities were suspended from 1793 to 1896. With the growth of higher education in the postwar years in France, in 1970 the university was divided into thirteen autonomous institutions. The university is often referred to the Sorbonne after the collegiate institution (Collège de Sorbonne) founded around 1257 by Robert de Sorbon, but it was always larger than the Sorbonne. Of the thirteen current successor universities, four have premises in the historical Sorbonne building, and three of them include "Sorbonne" in their names.